of 62
Current View
HWRHS
Post-Secondary
Planning Guide
For The Class of 2014
Hamilton-Wenham Regional High School
South Hamilton,
MA 01982
978-468-0480
Guidance Director
Frank Sullivan 978-468-0430 f.sullivan@hwschools.net
Guidance Counselors
Julia Cahill-O’Shea 978-468-0431 j.cahill-oshea@hwschools.net
Hugh Kirkland 978-468-04
12 h.kirkland@hwschools.net
Rochelle Morin 978-468-0435 r.morin@hwschools.net
Guidance Secretary
Andrea Adamo 978-468-0480 a.adamo@hwschools.net
Records Secretary
Mary Nicklas 978-468-0491 m.nicklas@hwschools.net
Post-Secondary Planning
This Guide is designed to help you explore yo
ur post high school opti
ons. The process will
be different for each of you. Whether you
are looking to attend a college, a technical
school, the military, take a year off or seek em
ployment, it is our ho
pe that the following
information will make the transi
tion easier. We encourage you
to speak with your parents,
counselor, teachers and friends about your future plans.
The information included in this material ha
s been gleaned from a
variety of sources and
condensed into one packet to simplify the pr
ocess of applying for
admission into post-
secondary institutions. By following the suggested procedures outlined here, you can be
confident that you will have the best chance of being accepted at the school or program for
which you qualify. Share this information with
your parents and continue to talk with your
counselor about transition planning. Keep this manual handy as a guide, but remember to
use your guidance counselor as a resource pers
on who is well informed and able to assist
you in the transition process. Good luck!
You and your parents are encouraged to meet
with your counselor who will help you with
your transition planning. In addition to offering individual meetings with students and
parents, the Guidance Department sponsors a
series of presentations for parents and their
college-bound students. A panel of college ad
missions representatives
will share its insight
into the college search,
visitation and application processes
in the winter of junior year.
Counselors will also present an informational evening for seniors and their parents in the fall
of senior year. A financial aid evening will be hosted by the Department in cooperation with
the Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority in the winter of the senior year.
Guidance Department
775 Bay Road
2
Table of Contents
Post Secondary Options.........
....................... 4
Gap Year...........................
.......................... 5
Co-curricular Activities Resu
m
.........
............................... 8
actors About Yourself to Consider
When Choosing a College................. 10
te Your Co
llege Preference
s........................................... 12
esources
.................................
.................................................... 16
College Fairs and College
Nights.......................................................... 19
..................
..........................................
............................. 19
dmissions Test Informatio
n................................................
............................ 23
dents with
Disabilities ............
........................................ 31
ervice Academies..................
......................................................
........................ 33
...
......................................................
....................... 34
...................................................
............................... 35
.........
..............................
40
.................................
............................... 47
ecommendation Informatio
n Form.................................
............................... 48
......................................................
...
.....................................................
...
e................................
F
Questions to Evalua
College Planning Timeline
......................................................
............................. 15
R
Naviance...............
Reference Handbooks and
Guides....................................................... 17
College Catalogues and
Websites.....................
.................................... 17
College Representative
Visits............................
................................... 19
Campus Visits...
HWRHS Guidance Departme
nt Website.............................................. 22
A
Information for Stu
Information for Student At
hletes.......................................
............................... 32
nformation for Students Pursuing the Arts.........
......................................... 33
I
S
The ROTC Program...............
College Admission Criter
ia
Massachusetts State Colleges
and Universities Minimum
Admission Requiremen
ts..........................................
............................... 35
Statement of Students’ Rights
and Responsibilities in the
College Admissions Proces
s ................................................
................... 38
he Application Proce
ss................................................
T
Types of Admissions Progra
ms..........................................
................................ 40
Application Procedures............
......................................................
...................... 43
Transcript Package Processi
ng.............................................
............................. 44
Top 10 (+2) Things that Seniors
and Their Parents Need to Know
About the Colleg
e Application Proc
ess ................................................ 45
Transcript Release Authoriz
ation.......................................
............................... 46
Letters of Recommendatio
n...............
R
College Application Check
list................................................
.............................. 49
Summary of College Applicatio
n Procedure.........
........................................... 50
The Admissions Intervie
w............................................................
...................... 50
Writing Your College Essa
y...................................................
.............................
52
How Admission Decisions ar
e Made...........................
...................................... 54
Financial Aid: Step by St
ep...................................................
............................. 56
3
Pos
ns
reparatory Schools
to
or
for
a
st
.
at
t-Secondary Optio
P
Some students may want to consider an a
dditional year of secondary school prior
attending college. Students typically look
for a PG year to improve study skills
improve their academic record. Often times college coaches suggest a PG year
athletes. Some students apply to both colleges as well as a PG year at
preparatory school. Decisions and deposits
are typically not required until May 1
Addit
ional information with respect to prep schools can be found
ns.com
www.peterso
.
An Al
ternative Year
S students may choose not to go directly to college after high school. Som
ome
e
.
r
to
ith
include class work in
d
rom a couple years
and up
ng
of
s
he
b
to
will seek
alternatives for a year such as travel or an internship experience
Students may request to defer their admissions to a college for one semester or
one year, to explore other avenues. See more information on page 5 (Gap Year).
Business, Trade or Technical Programs
The training provided by schools that offe
r specific programs, prepares students fo
employment in those fields. The length of a program varies from several weeks
several years. Costs also vary depending on
the type and length of the program.
Apprenticeship Training
An apprenticeship is a formal way of learning a trade or a skill by working w
someone who works at that particular job. Programs typically
addition to full time work. Apprenticeships usually cover periods of time specifie
by the labor union or government. Programs vary in length f
to six years. An advantage to an apprenticeship is that rather than payi
for the training, a student is being paid while learning a skill. The number
openings is limited and not all qualified a
pplicants can enter such programs. Exam
and interviews are often required.
Military Training
Branches of the military offer training in
almost 1500 different occupations. T
training varies in length of time and may include classroom study, on-the-jo
training, or both. Enlistees are paid while in training. For more information go
www.myfuture.com
.
Correspondence Study
This is a way of continuing education if a student cannot or does not wish to atten
d
e
ull
TV
formal classes. Many courses help an individual learn a specialized skill. Th
student is required to pass tests before receiving credit. Students can work f
time while studying in their spare time. Jo
bs are as diverse as accountant, radio/
repair, locksmith, gem identification, appliance repair and legal assistant.
4
Working Full Time
he North Shore Career One Stop offices (
www.nscareers.org
T
) in Salem, Lynn and
range of no-cost services to meet the employment needs of
Gloucester offer a wide
job seekers.
Additional websites:
www.careerbuilder.com
,
www.futurescan.com
,
www.stats.bls.gov/oco
(Occupational Outlook Handbook),
www.uncwil.edu/stuaff/career/Majors/index.htm
(What can I do with a Major in?)
Gap Year
mmon for a student to take a break after high school instead
g
king a break, we recommend you go through the college application process in
pay a deposit to a college, you may
nity. The website
www.gapyear.com
coming more co
It is be
of go
ing directly off to college. Some students do volunteer work, while others take
time to learn a new skill or learn about another culture. As college admissions have
become increasingly competitive, a number of students opt to defer admission and
explore other avenues for a year before a
ttending college. If you are considerin
ta
your senior year. At the same time you
request that the college delay your entry for up to one year. Many colleges support
this idea. The following list of programs
highlights a few of the options available,
including two services that match students with appropriate options. The Guidance
epartment has a more thorough list
available for students interested in
D
investigating this opportu
also provides
ent of programs
that are available to students after
munity se
rvice organizations or businesses in
ne
w skills, the language and culture.
800-876-2377 * Website:
www.afs.org
infor
mation on an assortm
graduating from high school.
Examples of Interim Programs
AFS (American Field Service) Intercultural Programs, Inc.
Provides intercultural learning opportunities abroad with the aim of
promoting a more just and peaceful world. Students age 18 and over work
in over 50 countries in com
countries abroad while learning
* Telephone:
n awards. The typical commitment is 10 months.
* Telephone: 800-94-ACORPS * Website:
www.americorps.gov
Americorps Corporation for National Service
A national initiative involving people of all ages in community services
through full and part time programs. In exchange for service, participants
receive educatio
ear.org
City Year
Putting idealism to work – City Year, an AmeriCorps program, is a national
service organization which unites yo
ung adults ages 17
-24 from diverse
racial, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds for a demanding year of full-
time community service, leadership
development and civic engagement.
* Telephone: 617-927-2600 * Website:
www.cityy
5
CIEE
The Council on International Educational Exchange provides quality programs
and services for students. * Website:
www.ciee.org
ynamy Intern
D
ship Year
eek, full time
program fees
e
* Telephone: 508-755-2571 * Website:
www.dynamy.org
A semester or year of education in the form of nine w
internships in Worcester businesses and organizations. The
include local housing and a three week Outward Bound experience at th
start of the Program.
Earthwatch Institute
Founded in 1972, this non-profit organi
zation matches paying volunteers with
scientific and conservation projects around the world. The cost range is $500
to $3000 depending on distance and length of stay. The average length of
stay is a few weeks to a month.
* Telephone: 978-461-0081 * Website:
www.earthwatch.org
Habitat for Humanity
Volunteers build housing for low income families. Typically volunteers work
for a few days for a week on construction projects at hundreds of sites
around the country. They take volunteers for up to one year. There are also
international projects in which people work for two weeks.
* Telephone: 800-HABITAT * Website:
www.habitat.org
Outward Bound
Outward Bound is a non
-profit education
al organization offering challenging
outdoor programs for nearly 60 years. Programs range from three weeks to
www.outwardbound.org
a semester.
* Telephone: 800-779-7935 * Website:
Nation
bsite:
www.nols.edu/NOLSHome.html
al Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS)
NOLS is a wilderness education school offering expedition courses in eight
countries from ten days to a full se
mester in length. Students learn
s
leadership skills, wilderness fir t aid and outdoor skills while learning about
responsible outdoor recreation.
* Telephone: 307-332-5300 * We
Rustic
Webs
Pathways
Rustic Pathways provides quality travel and service programs for students
s mo
and families in some of the world’ st welcoming countries.
* Telephone: 800-321-4353 * ite:
www.rusticpathways.com/gap
Schoo
l for Field Studies, Environmental Field Studies Abroad
Students will conduct hands-on, community-focused environmental fieldwork
on programs in Australia, Canada, Kenya, Costa Rica, Mexico and the British
West Indies.
*
* Telephone: 800-989-4418 Website:
www.fieldstudies.org
6
Sol Ab
ugh
ousing with carefully chosen local ho
st families, quality Spanish Language
el excursions, and
an array of cultural activities.
road
A study abroad experience with a
genuine cultural immersion thro
h
classes, unique trav
* Telephone: 512-380-1003 * Website:
www.solabroad.com
periment in International Living
This international no
The Ex
nprofit organization promotes intercultural learning
tional group t
training, au pair and other cultural i
mmersion programs in over 25 countries.
800-345-2929 * Website:
www.experiment.org
through home stays, educa
ravel, study abroad, language
* Telephone:
The Ce
pursue structured alternatives to formal
ients
volunteer positions and cultural
study programs worldwide.
13-585-0980 * Website:
www.interimprograms.com
nter for Interim Programs (charges a fee)
Founded in 1980, with offices in Massachusetts and New Jersey, Interim is a
service that enables people to
education or work by matching cl ’ interests with over 2,500 internships,
* Telephone: 4
Time O
chool and college
efore taking the
* Telephone: 617-698-8977 * Website:
www.timeoutassociates.com
ut Associates (charges a fee)
This service works with individual clients to search for options for summers,
semesters and full year experiences. Clients include high s
students looking for a break b
next step.
7
Co-curricular Activities Resume
ial employers and colleges like to know about a student’s activities. T
Potent
he first
step in
o re
su e is l
ny productive use of time applies. The following categories will help you organize
f the resume builder on Naviance. The
inform
proces
Acade
when
Athleti
o-curricular Activities outside of school
Volunteer or community
service: activity, year
Number of hours: brief description
ork Experience
Job title (most recent first): durati
on, position, responsibilities, year
on-work summer experiences
Summer school, camp, etc
Experience, description, duration, year
ravel
Location, duration, brief description
terest and hobbies
Skills acquired, duration, level of involvement, year
preparing an activities record r
m isting the things you have done.
A
your list.
Hint: Take advantage o
ation you enter can be accessed
by your counselor to support the
sing of your se
condary school report.
mic Honors
Department awards: what and
NHS
Other: title, description, year
cs
Sports: position, leadership, year
Honors and Awards: title, description, year
Co-curricular activities in school
List in order of significance either in terms of time commitment or
achievement
Position, activity, time (hrs/wk), year
Special Honors and Awards
C
W
N
T
In
A
NOTE OF CAUTION:
All students should be aware of the implications of the image that
th
ey portray on the internet. A NACAC articl
e stresses the importance of projecting a
p
rofessional impression through voice mail me
ssages, e-mail account titles and MySpace,
F
acebook or other social networking sites.
8
S
ample Resume
Ima B. Student
Class of 2013
Hamilton-Wenham Regional High School
South Hamilton, MA 01982
Date of Birth
April 25, 1995
dent Activities Grade
11-12
11
CARE member 10-12
11-12
10-11
11-12
Varsity Basketball 10-12
9-10
Clean houses 9-10
op & Shop 11
11-12
11
NHS 11-12
sister 10-12
Personal
Home Addre
ss
10 Main St.
Hamilton, MA 01982
Stu
Class Secretary
Reporter for School Newspaper
Yearbook Staff
Athletics
Varsity Track
Varsity Soccer
Employment
Childcare for two summers
Cashier at St
Office Assistant Stop & Shop 12
Awards
CAL conference basketball
Boston Globe Scholastic Art Award
Other
Baby-sit
for younger
Tutor math at HW
RHS 11-12
P
lay Piano 5-12
Hobbies: biking, reading, skating
9
Factors Ab
out Yourself to Cons
ider When Choosing a College
Examine your interests, abilities, goals an
d expectations. It is crucial that you
conduct a Self Assessment.
There are a series of quest
focus on your college
sele
ctions. The process really
praisal of your
interests and personality will help
ich fulfill your needs. We
have adapted the following from and gratef lly acknowledge the work of Elizabeth
Scheib
n, CT., A
College
bring t
the
founda
earch process.
Your G
What
occupy
u define success? Are you satisfied with your accomplishments to
fts and
st like
r you wanted, how would
o or
king?
Your E
your academic interests
Which courses have you enjoyed the
er any
pics have
ojects,
ading or school activities have
you chosen? What jobs or volunteer
ve you done? What do your choices show about your interests and
aching
your interest and effort the most?
you describe your school? Have you invested yourself in learning
talents
ve you felt encouraged to produce quality work? Have you
work?
mulating learning opportunity? How much do
you genuinely like to read, discuss issues and exchange ideas?
ions listed below that may help you
beg
An honest ap
ins and ends with you.
you choose colleges wh
u
e, former Associate Dean of Admissio
ns, Wesleyan University, Middletow
Admissions Workbook. This process is not designed to overburden you but to
e fact than an ho
nest and deliberate self-appraisal sets
o your attention th
ion to the college s
t
oals and Values
st?
What part of your high school experience have you enjoyed the mo
did you miss out on? What would you do differently if you could?
What do you value? What do you care most about? What concerns
our time, effort and energy?
y
How do yo
date? What do you want to accomplish in the years ahead?
What kind of person would you like to become? Of your unique gi
strengths, which would you most like to
develop? What would you mo
to change about yourself?
If there w
as a year to go anywhere and do whateve
you spend this year? Is there anything you have s
ecretly wanted to d
be?
What events or experiences have shaped your growth and way of thin
ducation
What are
?
most? W
hich courses have been
the most difficult for you?
What do you choose to learn when you can learn on your own? Consid
interests which you have pursued beyond the classroom. What to
you chosen for a research project? Which lab reports, independent pr
outside re
work ha
the way you like to learn?
How do you learn best? What methods
of teaching and style of te
engage
How would
and academic success? Have you worked to develop your interests,
and abilities? Ha
produced quality
What has been your most sti
10
How well have you worked with your school to prepare yourself for college?
ea
en
to your potential in high school? Is your academic
rests
d
ur parents and friends expect of you? Have their expectations
In what areas of skills or knowledge do you feel con
fident? Is there any ar
in which you feel inadequately prepared for college study? Have you be
challenged by your courses? Is there some course planning that you need to
do with your counselor in order to be better prepared?
Have you worked up
record an accurate measure of your ability and potential? Are your SAT
scores an accurate reflection of your ability? What do you consider the best
measure of your potential for college work?
Are there any outside circumstances that
have interfered with your academic
performance? Consider the following factors: after school job, home
responsibilities, personal difficulties,
excessive school activities, illness or
emotional stresses, outside pressure
s, inadequate language preparation,
problems scheduling courses.
Your Activities and Inte
What activities do
y
ou enjoy outside the daily routine of school and other
responsibilities? Which activities have meant the most to you? Looking
back, would you have made different choices?
Do your activities show any pattern of commitment, competence or
contribution?
How would others describe your role
in your school or home community?
What do you consider your mo
st significant contribution?
After a long, hard day, what do you most enjoy doing? What do you do for
fun; for relaxation?
T
he World Around You
How would you describe your school, family and hometown? Has your
e
nvironment influenced your way of thinking? Have your interests an
abilities been acknowledged or limited in any way?
What do yo
influenced th
e
goals and standards that you set for yourself? What pressures
have you felt to conform?
What has been the most controversial issue in your schoo
l or community?
How does this issue concern you? What has been your reaction to the
controversy? What is your
opinion about this issue?
Have you ever encountered people who thought and acted differently than
you did? What viewpoints have challenged you the most? How did you
respond? What did you learn about yourself and others?
What distresses you mos
t about the world around you? Assuming the
obligation and the opportunity to change the world, where would you start?
Do you have any current heroes or heroin
e
s? Historical ones? Literary ones?
What books have you read that have challenged your way of thinking?
11